Category Archives: Pedigree

Pedigree Recall


June 30, 2012

At PEDIGREE®, we care about all dogs and their safety and well-being is extremely important to us. For that reason, we have initiated a voluntary recall of a limited range of three varieties of PEDIGREE® weight management canned dog food products due to a potential choking risk. Cans of this product may contain small pieces of blue plastic, which broke off a conveyor belt during the production process. The issue has been resolved at our manufacturing facility by replacing a conveyor belt with a redesigned tracking mechanism.

At Mars Petcare, we take our responsibility to pets and their owners seriously. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by this recall. Please see detailed information on the affected products below. You can also reach us at 1-877-720-3335 from 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. CST if you have questions.

MARS PETCARE US ANNOUNCES VOLUNTARY RECALL OF LIMITED RANGE OF PEDIGREE® BRAND WET DOG FOOD

Franklin, Tennessee (June 30, 2012)– Today, Mars Petcare US announced a voluntary recall of a limited range of three varieties of PEDIGREE® weight management canned dog food products due to a potential choking risk.

Affected product may contain small pieces of blue plastic, which entered the food during the production process. The source of the plastic has been identified and the issue resolved. We encourage consumers who have purchased affected product to discard the food or return it to the retailer for a full refund or exchange. While a small number of consumers have reported finding the plastic pieces, we have not received any reports of injury or illness associated with the affected product. The lot codes indicated below should not be sold or consumed.

Affected product was distributed to retail customers throughout the United States. Mars Petcare US is working with all of our distributors and retail customers to ensure that the recalled products are no longer sold and are removed from inventory.

Recalled Pet Food Only cans of PEDIGREE® weight management canned dog food varieties with the production codes shown below are included in this voluntary recall. Each product will have a lot code printed on the end of the can that begins with 209, 210, 211 or 212 and a Best Before date that falls between 2/24/2014 and 3/23/2014.

No other PEDIGREE® products are affected, including any other variety of wet food, dry dog food, or dog treats.

At Mars Petcare US, we take our responsibility to pets and their owners seriously. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by this recall. Pet owners who have questions about the recall should call 1-877-720-3335 or visit www.pedigree.com/update.

NOTE: Please see website for further information :http://www.pedigree.com/update/

2010-Consumer Complaints about Pedigree


2010 Consumer Complaints about Pedigree

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/pets/pedigree.html

SOURCE: 

Pedigree-General Info and Contact


PEDIGREE® Brand
Mars Petcare US, Inc
315 Cool Springs Blvd, Franklin, TN 37067
®/™ Trademarks © Mars, Incorporated 2008

Phone Consumer Affairs toll-free at: 1-800-525-5273

Website:  http://www.pedigree.com/default.aspx

2008-03-16-Pedigree-Pattern in fatally contaminated pet food


Pattern found in fatally contaminated pet food
By ELIZABETH WEISE
and JULIE SCHMIT
Gannett News Service

2008-03-11
The outbreak of contamination in pet foods that killed hundreds and perhaps thousands of U.S. cats and dogs last year wasn’t the first such incident, veterinary pathologists have determined.

A 2004 outbreak that also involved pet foods contaminated with industrial chemicals sickened more than 6,000 dogs and a smaller number of cats across Asia.

Kidney failure in the animals was linked to Pedigree dog foods and Whiskas cat foods manufactured in Thailand by Mars Inc. Thousands of pets died, according to Asian press reports at the time.
The Asian outbreak was little known in the United States until it was reported last week by the blog Pet Connection. In the American public’s view, the U.S. outbreak several years later appeared to be the first of its kind.

Veterinarians in Asia initially blamed the 2004 problems on fungal toxins, which also was one of the first suspicions when more than 1,000 brands of cat and dog food were recalled last year.

It took months for U.S. veterinarians, federal officials and scientists to find out what was in the food that was sickening and killing cats and dogs.

The culprit eventually was determined to be grain from China that had been spiked with the industrial chemical melamine to make it appear higher in protein. The melamine was contaminated with cyanuric acid.

It was a comment by a Korean graduate student in the midst of the 2007 outbreak that led Cathy Brown, a specialist in renal pathology at Georgia’s Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory to suspect this had happened before. Brown eventually tracked down tissue samples from the pets who died in 2004 at the Kyungpook National University in Korea.